Sunday, January 1, 2017

Kickin' it with Jean Stephenson and Wham!

I have a confession: I am a closet feminist. A few of you have known my secret for a while due to the socks I wear or my past Broad City references here on the blog. I am more of a first generation feminist than a second or third because my feminist leanings focus on education rights and the elimination of double standards. 

I grew up and was raised by factory workers. Men and women worked side by side and they all pulled their weight. It had nothing to do with a certain gender being unable to do something because all performed. I was never told that I would be treated differently just because of my gender and in all honesty, it never crossed my mind until I moved east.

I don't want to earn my place because of a statistical need for a person of my ethnicity or gender. I want to earn my place based on proven ability. It is a point of pride for me -- kind of like how I want to be a breadwinner and am fiercely independent. I want to blow up my balloon of success by working hard, not have the air let out simply because of the way I look. I have never used my body, family or circumstances to not adhere to a deadline because I want to keep that clock going.

As a society and community, we need to support each other. This is not about women rising up against men. In fact, I think women supporting women is something that needs to be more prevalent in society in general. When one woman is undercutting another woman based simply on difference of opinions or something simple like they way they look, we lose focus what we really need to do: support each other and raise the bar.

Jean Stephenson, one of the baddest genealogists you have probably never heard of, wrote a special publication for the National Genealogical Society in 1939-40 titled Heraldry. If you look at the history of heraldry in America and abroad, it was a male dominated field and still is. This was in 1939, people! Jean's knowledge is seen in black and white in this publication and is a must in your genealogical library along with any of her other publications. Study her career and see, clearly, how many glass ceilings she Super-Womaned through.

I was raised on Wham! and was saddened by George Michael's death, so I recommend this gem of a jam.