Saturday, May 13, 2017

Kickin' it with Gordon L. Remington and Hot Chip

The first Hawaii themed genealogy article I read (four years after it was published) was Gordon L. Remington's "Lost Boys and Imprudent Young Men: Using U.S. Consular Despatches from Hawaii to Track Nineteenth-Century Prodigals," from the March 1996 National Genealogical Society Quarterly. With typical Remington creativity and innovation, Record Group 59 (American Consular Despatches) accompanied by Record Group 84 (Foreign Service Posts of the Dept. of State), was used to establish the timeline of those illusive male ancestors who go off the grid to seek whatever it is that makes ancestors leave their homeland.  What is so cool about using these two record groups in unison is that you can see the original correspondence and the reply --- allowing the entire conversation to be viewed. How often do you see correspondence from one side and wonder what prompted that reply? These are comely records, and Record Groups 59 and 84 show the back and forth. Remington's study provides examples which you can dissect to create a similar research plan that is transferrable to other record groups and research situations:  other military records or civil records from other years could be "Tetris"ed into this methodology.

The article also highlights motives for leaving and motives for seeking. This study led me to the book, The First Strange Place: Race and Sex in World War II Hawaii by Beth Bailey and David Farber. Although set in WWII, it made me deeply analyze why non-Natives first arrived at Hawaii: the allure, the race relations and then the final product of a multicultural society planted in the middle of an ocean and featuring parallel histories (American and Native). These histories, motives, and truths are on display in Record Groups 59 and 84, and can be seen in other record groups and methodologies if we are open to them.

Hot Chip's DJ Kicks is a good time. There is profanity, so you may want to ear-muff it through some of that, if you think it will bring on the vapors. I will *literally* stop everything I am doing to hear a New Order song, so I was quite pleased to find one of them on there, along with Etta James & Sugar Pie DeSanto's "In the Basement."

For a more General rated listen, check out Ben Bernie on Internet Archive. My personal fav. is "Who's Afraid of the Big Bad Wolf [tra-la-la-la-la]."

Gordon L. Remington, "Lost Boys and Imprudent Young Men: Using U.S. Consular Despatches from Hawaii to Track Nineteenth-Century Prodigals," National Genealogical Society Quarterly 84 (March 1996): 28-38.

Beth Bailey and David Farber, The First Strange Place: Race and Sex in World War II Hawaii (Baltimore & London: John Hopkins University Press, 1992.

Hot Chip DJ Kicks

Ben Bernie discography from 78rmp